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Eagle's Landing Christian Counseling Center, Inc.

 
$410.00 contributions
9 donors

Raised: $410Remaining: $4590

People are Important! Everyone deserves to heal. Help us BREAK the cycle as we start Burden Bearer Groups in various communities.

Why intervention?
1.  Because people matter.
2.  We live as part of systems; what effects one part of the system affects the other parts, too, whether they are aware of it or not.
3.  Childhood trauma changes a person's perception of themselves, of others, and of God. By using talk therapy in a Christian setting, people are helped to heal and to improve their view of God to be loving, and kind. 

Points of intervention: 1. Education; 2. Prevention; 3. Treatment. 
1. Education (Develop curriculum to inform and educate on the history, research outcomes and implications.
Inform key leaders, principle distributors of the outcomes of the ACE study. (Watch a PowerPoint at http://www.slideshare.net/DeniceColson/links-between-childhood-trauma-and-adult-disease-becoming-trauma-informed) Inform adults, caregivers, young parents. Inform pastors, ministers, and other community leaders.
2. Prevention (Purchase or develop and implement ACE informed parenting classes for parenting infants, toddlers, elementary, ‘tweens and teens. Include major focus on substance abuse as a major contribution to ACE.)
3.  Treatment (Educate adults about ACE impact in their own lives; implement individual and groups counseling to address ACE in a healing and productive manner. Research shows that the best parenting training involves helping adults deal with their own past childhood issues. Substance abuse treatment is a major focus.
Help us work to Break the Cycle!

“Children with toxic stress live much of their lives in fight, flight or fright (freeze) mode. They respond to the world as a place of constant danger. With their brains overloaded with stress hormones and unable to function appropriately, they can’t focus on learning. They fall behind in school or fail to develop healthy relationships with peers or create problems with teachers and principals because they are unable to trust adults. Some kids do all three. With despair, guilt and frustration pecking away at their psyches, they often find solace in food, alcohol, tobacco, methamphetamines, inappropriate sex, high-risk sports, and/or work and over-achievement. They don’t regard these coping methods as problems. Consciously or unconsciously, they use them as solutions to escape from depression, anxiety, anger, fear and shame.”  (Jane Ellen Stevens, Oct. 3, 2012)
Findings of the ACE Study:
As the number of ACE increase, the risk for the following health problems increases in a strong and graded fashion:
·         alcoholism and alcohol abuse
·         chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
·         depression
·         fetal death
·         health-related quality of life
·         illicit drug use
·         ischemic heart disease (IHD)
·         liver disease
·         risk for intimate partner violence
·         multiple sexual partners
·         sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)
·         smoking
·         suicide attempts
·         unintended pregnancies

ACEs create a "chronic public health disaster. “Children affected by ACEs appear in all human service systems throughout the lifespan -- childhood, adolescence, and adulthood -- as clients with behavioral, learning, social, criminal, and chronic health problems." (Jane Ellen Stevens, Oct. 3, 2012) 
Donate to ELCCC for the Georgia ACE Awareness Project NOW! Like us on Facebook!


by Anonymous donated $10.00
Jowanna D donated $50.00
Jowanna D donated $50.00
Jowanna D donated $50.00
Jowanna D donated $50.00
Jowanna D donated $50.00

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